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There is a fatal overdose in Colorado every 9 hours and 36 minutes.

 

We have lost 12,297 people in Colorado to overdoses since 1999.  

NALOXONE 101: HOW TO REVERSE AN OVERDOSE

Naloxone (also known as Narcan®) is a prescription medicine that reverses an opioid overdose, which can be caused by prescription analgesics (e.g., Percocet, OxyContin), and heroin. Naloxone will only reverse an opioid overdose, it does not prevent deaths caused by other drugs such as benzodiazepines (e.g.Xanax®, Klonopin® and Valium®), bath salts, cocaine, methamphetamine or alcohol. However, naloxone may also be effective for polysubstance overdoses such as a combined opioid and alcohol overdose. It cannot be used to get high and is not addictive. Naloxone is safe and effective; emergency medical professionals have used it for decades. For more detailed information, visit www.drugs.com/pro/naloxone.html

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PROVEN STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING OVERDOSE DEATHS

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NALOXONE

If you or someone you know is at risk of a heroin or painkiller overdose, get naloxone now.  It’s easy.  And fast.  Over 200 Pharmacies in Colorado carry Naloxone, available to anyone under standing orders.  Which means you can get it today.  Recently the Colorado State Legislature passed a new law that expands access to this lifesaving drug.  Ask your pharmacist about Naloxone or consult our map to find a pharmacy near you.

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HARM REDUCTION & EDUCATION

Harm reduction programs have existed for more than three decades around the globe and work to counter some of the deadly consequences of drug use through a set of practical, clinically-proven strategies that include health education programs, access to sterile syringes, disposal of contaminated medical products, naloxone access, and other programs.  Harm reduction programs, education, and consultation with your healthcare providers are important safety measures to help reduce your risk of an overdose.

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ALTERNATIVES TO PUBLIC INJECTION

Using alone, in places that are not sterile, and without access to naloxone or a lifeline in the event of an accidental overdose kill tens of thousands of people each year. Many of these overdoses occur in public parks, bathrooms, and other community spaces. Fortunately, there are healthier alternatives to public injection which have been implemented in several cities around the globe. These cities have responded to the risk of overdose, exposure to communicable diseases, and other social harms by relocating them from public bathrooms and parks into a carefully monitored, clinical setting. Learn more here.
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